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A Washington post article this week was titled Eat More Fish, Risks Overstated. Many scientists have been saying this all along.  This message has been delivered for years now from the Institute of Medicine, Harvard, FDA, and the American Heart Association.  However, many media sources use EDF, Monterey Bay Aquarium and similar sources as their references on the subject.

The benefits of eating fish outweigh the risks of eating fish. There are still advisories not to eat too much tilefish, mackerel, swordfish and king mackerel. With the exception of swordfish, most customers never see these four fish in restaurants or at the fish counter. What customers see are shrimp, tilapia, cod, haddock, flounder, farmed salmon, wild salmon, and more. All of these seafood items and more are healthy to eat, with minimal risk of contaminants. Eat more fish, the risks have been overstated.

Hopefully, this message will gain momentum and start getting onto the front page or at least page 1 of the food section. The message needs to be repeated on network news, talk shows, morning news shows, and on the web. 

 I have counted over 20 separate studies touting the health benefits of eating fish. The benefits range from heart health, child brain development, to benefits for arthritis patients. The time has come to stop telling consumers that eating fish is risky. Eating fish is healthy. Those that say otherwise should think about the impact of what they are preaching. The time has come to change the message to the overall health benefits of fish consumption. It is the responsible thing to do.    

MadelynKearns

Contact Madelyn Kearns

Associate Editor
mkearns@divcom.com
CliffWhite

Contact Cliff White

Editor
cwhite@divcom.com

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