Aaron Orlowski

Aaron Orlowski

Contributing Editor

Aaron Orlowski is a West Coast-based freelance journalist who writes about fisheries, food, science, and the environment. Before settling in Portland, Oregon, he worked for newspapers in California, North Dakota, and South Dakota. In his spare time, he attempts to salvage untested recipes in the kitchen.

Published on
May 8, 2019

Alaskan commercial fishermen are specializing more and more, leaving them more vulnerable to the immense uncertainty fishermen have to contend with, according to a new study.

Targeting a diverse array of fish types in different regions can allow fishermen to weather the ups and downs instigated by fish population changes, new regulations, deflating markets and environmental disasters. But fishermen in Alaska are increasingly specializing. Fewer

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Published on
August 8, 2018

Climate change is driving fish species to migrate to new areas, and in the process they’re crossing political boundaries – potentially setting up future conflicts as some countries lose access to fish and others gain it, according to a recent study published in the journal Science.

Already, fish and other marine animals have shifted toward the poles at an average rate of 70 kilometers per decade. That rate is projected to continue or

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Published on
August 1, 2018

Few international rules govern vessel safety for the 40 million people who work in the fishing industry – a stark contrast to the stringent vessel safety rules that apply to the global shipping industry’s two million workers.

The results are telling: 24 million fishing industry workers are injured every year, and more than 24,000 fishing industry workers die, compared to roughly 300 merchant seafarer deaths per year, according to The

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Published on
June 21, 2018

A flurry of planned and proposed offshore wind projects in the Northeastern United States is causing anxiety among fishermen, who are worried that the turbines will disrupt marine life, make fishing more difficult, and harm their livelihoods.

The United States’ nascent offshore wind industry is predicted to grow rapidly in the coming years as states create and follow through on requirements to source a greater portion of their energy from

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Published on
June 11, 2018

Two different governments had captured the STS-50, but it had escaped both times. Authorities believed the vessel was fishing illegally, and had regularly falsified its nationality, sailing under eight different national flags over the years.

When Indonesian authorities at last apprehended the vessel in early April, they were able to do so because of growing cooperation between countries and with nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) that are

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Published on
May 21, 2018

Starting in 2014, Indonesia implemented a set of controversial policies aimed at reducing IUU fishing, especially by foreign vessels. As a result, Indonesian fisheries authorities have sunk 318 illegal fishing boats, roughly 300 of which were foreign, while curtailing fishing permits for foreign vessels and banning transfers of fish at sea.

Those policies reduced fish catches and have the potential to jump-start fishery recovery, without harming

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Published on
April 11, 2018

At least every 30 seconds, more than 70,000 fishing vessels responsible for most of the world’s catch broadcast automatic identification systems (AIS) signaling their identity, location, and speed.

The AIS systems were originally designed to help large vessels avoid collisions on the open ocean, but in recent years, conservation groups and fisheries enforcement have used those signals for a new purpose: spotting vessels that might be

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Published on
March 9, 2018

The value of bitcoin, the most well-known crypto-currency, have surged in the last few years, then peaked at the end of 2017, and are now on a roller-coaster route of ups and downs. Early investors are collecting piles of money, while other crypto-currency hucksters hawk get-rich-quick schemes.

Bitcoin may seem convoluted, obscure and detached from lived reality, existing solely in bits and bytes and serving only the techno-savvy. But

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Published on
January 16, 2018

AquaBounty, the controversial U.S. firm that has figured out how to make Atlantic salmon grow faster through genetic engineering,  continues its march toward widespread distribution of its salmon.

On 12 January, it issued an underwritten public offering that is expected to raise USD 12 million (EUR 9.9 million). The company said the new funding will help it build and operate more production facilities in the United States.

The

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Published on
December 19, 2017

Federal organic certification for aquaculture products could open a new market to U.S. producers, but government progress toward creating standards stalled late in the administration of President Barack Obama and has yet to be renewed.

Aquaculture industry leaders involved in the drafting of the standards told SeafoodSource that the organic standards bogged down in late 2016, after years of incremental steps through the long and complicated

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