Features

Editorial commentaries on the domestic and global seafood industry.

Published on
August 8, 2018

Climate change is driving fish species to migrate to new areas, and in the process they’re crossing political boundaries – potentially setting up future conflicts as some countries lose access to fish and others gain it, according to a recent study published in the journal Science.

Already, fish and other marine animals have shifted toward the poles at an average rate of 70 kilometers per decade. That rate is projected to continue or

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By

Allan Lynch

Published on
August 7, 2018

Ashored Innovations, based in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, has joined the parade of companies focused on improving lobster fishing.

But Ashored isn’t looking to build a better lobster trap. Driven by new regulations to eliminate the entanglement threat to the North Atlantic right whale, Ashored is focused on developing a reliable, submersible buoy that goes down with the lobster trawl, is geo-trackable, and retrieved via acoustic release

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By

Nicki Holmyard

Published on
August 6, 2018

Sole of Discretion, set up by Caroline Bennett two years ago in Plymouth, in the United Kingdom, is part of a growing and successful trend for ethical fishmongers selling direct from the boat. 

Bennett, a pioneer who started Moshi Moshi, London’s first rotating sushi restaurant nearly 25 years ago, said her new project stemmed from her desire to source better and fresher seafood. 

“It was inspired by E.F. Schumaker’s

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By

Christine Blank

Published on
August 3, 2018

When Gilbert Arenas, former player for the NBA’s Washington Wizards, moved from Maryland to the West Coast of the United States, he missed crab and other seafood from the Chesapeake Bay. He had become a regular at Rockville, Maryland-based Cameron’s Seafood’s stores, which offer takeout dishes such as crab cakes and lobster rolls.

Now, Arenas is one of Cameron’s best online customers, ordering around USD 2,000 (EUR 1,726)

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By

Chris Loew

Published on
August 2, 2018

Somalia has the longest coastline of any country on the continent of Africa, and has abundant tuna and marlin resources. Yet, there are no Somali owners of commercial longline vessels. Fishing by Somalis is mainly conducted on an artisanal scale, with commercial fishing boats owned and crewed by foreigners. 

One Somali-American hopes to change that. 

Abdifatah Gaal came to the U.S.A. while young, graduated from the City

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Published on
August 1, 2018

Few international rules govern vessel safety for the 40 million people who work in the fishing industry – a stark contrast to the stringent vessel safety rules that apply to the global shipping industry’s two million workers.

The results are telling: 24 million fishing industry workers are injured every year, and more than 24,000 fishing industry workers die, compared to roughly 300 merchant seafarer deaths per year, according to The

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By

Mark Godfrey

Published on
July 31, 2018

The current Sino-U.S. trade war, which has seen tariffs imposed on most seafood products from China, is causing many seafood processing companies in China to reassess whether or not to move their operations out of the country. This is the second of a two-part series looking into the issue. Part one, "Is trade war pushing seafood processing out of China?" was published on Monday, 30 July.

SeafoodSource conducted a rudimentary if revelatory

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By

Christine Blank

Published on
July 27, 2018

Significantly cutting the number of seafood suppliers it buys from not only helped a major Singaporean hotel become more cost-efficient, it also aided sustainability efforts.

When the Grand Hyatt Singapore began transitioning its seafood procurement program towards sustainability several years ago, it partnered with the Marine Stewardship Council, the Aquaculture Stewardship Council, and the World Wildlife Fund.

Chef Lucas Glanville, director of

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By

Chris Chase

Published on
July 26, 2018

A recent study, published 25 July, has developed a method to identify areas with high risks of forced labor throughout the seafood supply chain. 

Published in Science Advances, the study – over the course of five years – developed a framework with five separate components that can allow companies to “efficiently and effectively assess” the risk of forced labor in supply chains. The framework utilizes existing data on

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By

Mark Godfrey

Published on
July 25, 2018

There are many obvious comparisons to be drawn between China and Spain when it comes to seafood. 

Spaniards eat more seafood per capita than any other nation in the European Union. Giant, Vigo-based fishing companies like Nueva Pescanova supply restaurant and supermarket chains around the world in much the same manner as some of their Chinese counterparts, who seek to extend their dominance from contract processing to brand

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