Jason Holland

Jason Holland

Contributing Editor reporting from London, UK

London-based seafood writer and communications consultant Jason Holland has been a contributing editor to SeafoodSource.com since January 2010. Jason has more than 25 years of experience as a B2B journalist and editor – a career that has taken him all over the world. He believes he found his true professional calling in 2004 when he started documenting the many facets of the international seafood industry and he’s particularly proud of the strong, collaborative relationships he has formed at all stages of the supply chain.

Published on
November 1, 2012

In September, following the advice of the Icelandic Marine Institute (MRI), Iceland dramatically reduced its haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) quota for the new fishing year, which is now under way.

The quota for the 2012-13 fishing season is just 32,000 metric tons (MT), down from 45,000 MT last year, and significantly smaller than the 64,000 MT set in 2010. Historically, the Icelandic fleet’s haddock catches have varied from 30,000 to

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Published on
October 18, 2012

Benedikt Jonsson, Icelandic Ambassador to the United Kingdom, took to the stage last week at a high-level fishing industry seminar in London to justify his country’s stance in the ongoing North East Atlantic mackerel dispute.

With the next round of catch share negotiations just a few weeks away, Jonsson stressed his country’s claim for a bigger allocation is valid because there has been a sharp rise in mackerel stocks in Icelandic

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Published on
September 27, 2012

Its abundance and affordability makes mackerel a firm favorite with television chefs and food writers, who go to great lengths to encourage consumers to eat more of these oil-rich fish. But the suspension of Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) status for North East Atlantic fisheries is testing the sourcing policies of some of Europe’s leading retailers.

The MSC suspended seven mackerel certifications at the end of March after the EU, Norway,

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Published on
September 20, 2012

Two weeks have passed since the cauldron, designed by Thomas Heatherwick to house the Olympic flame, was extinguished at the 2012 Paralympic Games and it’s already been more than a month since Lithuanian Laura Asadauskaite won the last gold of the Olympic Games for her endeavors in the modern pentathlon. For six enthralling weeks, the sporting drama of London 2012 was the hot topic — at the school gate, the water cooler, the bus stop,

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Published on
September 6, 2012

It’s September, which for shellfish lovers in the United Kingdom means one thing: the start of the native oyster (Ostrea edulis) eating season.

Unlike Pacific or rock oysters (Crassostrea gigas) which are accessible all year round, natives are only available from September to April, and were once widely considered superior to the Pacific oyster for their creamy flesh and distinctive salty flavor. However, the British public has lost touch with

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Published on
September 4, 2012

UK restaurateur, food writer and fishmonger Mitch Tonks is joining forces with South Devon College to open a new seafood academy at the college next month.

As part of the academy, one of the college’s training kitchens will be designated “The Mitch Tonks Seafood Academy,” where Brixham-based Tonks and the team from his Seahorse restaurant will run master-classes for existing college students as well as for chefs already working in the

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Published on
August 30, 2012

Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) farming was first commercially explored in Norway in the 1980s following the breakthrough of juvenile production, but the industry disappeared after just a few years. Cod aquaculture re-emerged around the start of the millennium, again mainly in Norway but also in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom and Iceland.

At that time, juvenile cod production technology was further developed and large hatcheries, based on

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Published on
August 26, 2012
Editor’s note: This is the second part of an interview with Rusnadi Padjung, deputy assistant for investment with the Indonesian Ministry for Regional Development (KPDT). Padjung says the growing international demand for pole-and-line tuna could revitalize Indonesia’s fishery within five years.  Click here to read part 1 of the interview.

Holland: In your opinion, what’s needed to get Indonesia’s pole-and-line industry back on track, and

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Published on
August 23, 2012

Indonesia is a traditional pole-and-line tuna producing country, but its interest in this traditional catching method has been decreasing in favor of the large volumes of fish that can be caught by purse seining. However, Rusnadi Padjung, deputy assistant for investment with the Indonesian Ministry for Regional Development (KPDT), told SeafoodSource the growing international demand for pole-and-line tuna could be of huge benefit to the

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Published on
August 9, 2012

Sainsbury’s new retail report, “Our Future with Fish,” delivered valuable insight into the seafood purchasing trends of UK consumers. It found that not only are Brits starting to eat a more diverse range of species and consuming two percent more fish per capita head than they were in 1975, but that their purchasing decisions are being increasingly influenced by what they watch on TV and view online.

With the country’s strong celebrity

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