Environment & Sustainability

Published on
September 26, 2018

The Marine Stewardship Council is looking into changes to the requirements of the its standards for certifying fisheries as sustainable.

The MSC has initiated a review of its fisheries standard, a process the organization undertakes every five years. On Tuesday, 25 September, it released its terms of reference for the review, which outlined which parts of its standard it will look at in detail – a first step in a potentially

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By

Jason Holland

Published on
September 26, 2018

Traditional artisanal fishing has been harmed by European Union fishing policies that favor big businesses and ignore other more sustainable approaches to conserving fish stocks, new research from the University of Kent, United Kingdom, claims.

This failing by European fisheries policymakers is the main finding of research by Alicia Said, Douglas MacMillan, and Joseph Tzanopoulos of the School of Anthropology and Conservation (SAC), which has

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By

Allan Lynch

Published on
September 25, 2018

A study into the wild Atlantic salmon population of Canada’s Inner Bay of Fundy is raising alarm among conservationists concerned about the impact the local aquaculture industry may be having on the species. 

A newly released study that reviewed data collected over the past 15 years found a breed of hybrid salmon have taken root in the waters of the Inner Bay of Fundy. 

The study was a review of the Science Associated with the

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By

Ben Fisher

Published on
September 20, 2018

American and Canadian negotiators have successfully brokered a deal to renew the Pacific Salmon Treaty. The compromise agreement has now been sent to Ottawa and Washington D.C. to be approved and ratified by their respective national governments. 

The Pacific Salmon Treaty is renegotiated every decade between the two countries to govern salmon catch, research, and enhancement in Alaska, Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. The treaty

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Published on
September 19, 2018

Dutch development bank FMO has invested USD 5 million (EUR 4.3 million) into the Meloy Fund, a partnership founded in 2016 to conduct impact investment supporting sustainable coastal fisheries in Indonesia and the Philippines.

The Meloy Fund is managed by the nonprofit conservation group Rare and provides equity to sustainable small-scale fishing-related enterprises in the Philippines and Indonesia. With a portfolio of EUR 9.2 billion (USD 10.7

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By

Chris Chase

Published on
September 19, 2018

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program has given a grant of USD 267,440 (EUR 229,165) to a Maine, U.S.A.-based nonprofit Manomet in order to work on creating a fishery for invasive European green crabs. 

The grant will allow Manomet to expand its project on creating a new economic opportunity out of soft-shell green crabs in New England. The green crab, a species that is invasive to New

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By

Nicki Holmyard

Published on
September 18, 2018

One in four fish in Africa is still caught illegally, despite the efforts of many African nations to overcome the problem.

According to the organization Stop Illegal Fishing, an independent non-profit based in Africa dedicated to ending illegal fishing in the continent’s waters, ongoing efforts are being made by the majority of African maritime states to end illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing, but greater momentum is needed

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By

Madelyn Kearns

Published on
September 14, 2018

On 1 September, University of Maine (UMaine) marine sciences research professor Richard Wahle took over for Robert Bayer as the new director of the school’s Lobster Institute. Bayer, who has been at the helm of the institute since 1995, is retiring from his work at UMaine this year, according to a press release from the college. 

In his new role with the Lobster Institute, Wahle plans “to energize and expand the existing

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By

Ivan Stupachenko

Published on
September 12, 2018

The five nations bordering the Caspian Sea have signed onto an agreement clarifying each country’s respective national fishing zones.

Russia, Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, and Iran signed the Convention on The Legal Status of the Caspian Sea in August at the 5th Caspian Summit, thus bringing clarity to fishing rights in the waters containing up to 90 percent of global stocks of sturgeon. Presidents of the five countries also

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By

Chris Loew

Published on
September 10, 2018

Through the Common Oceans ABNJ [areas beyond national jurisdiction] Tuna Project, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) coordinates a number of activities with a large array of partners to improve the sustainability of tuna fisheries. Among those, there have been a total of eight capacity building workshops, with the last and final one taking place in the final week of August in San Diego, California, U.S.A.

The workshops seek to bring

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