Food Safety & Health

Published on
October 18, 2017

A study published in the Pertanika journal Tropical Agricultural Science reports that compounds in “bekasam,” a fermented fish paste used as a condiment in Indonesia, inhibit an enzyme involved in the synthesis of cholesterol, similarly to statin drugs. 

Researchers from Sriwijaya University in Indonesia tested the effects of various peptides filtered out of bekasam on the enzyme HMG-CoA reductase. HMG-CoA reductase catalyzes the… Read More

By

Jason Holland

Published on
October 13, 2017
India shrimp

If the European Union were to implement an import ban on Indian shrimp products, as is now widely being contemplated by the supply chain, seafood buyers believe it is likely that the repercussions will be felt in other major shrimp markets.

India was the world’s No. 1 exporter of shrimp last year with the total volume produced by the country increasing to 434,484 metric tons (MT). The volume available for export in 2017 is forecast to have … Read More

Published on
October 13, 2017

A study led by Matthew Savoca of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has found that when algae grows on tiny bits of plastic in the ocean, it gives off an odor that attracts fish, leading fish to seek it out. 

The study, “Odors from marine plastic debris induce food search behaviors in a forage fish,” was published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Savoca additionally explained his findings in layman&r… Read More

By

Christine Blank

Published on
September 27, 2017

An unusual bloom of phytoplankton in the Casco Bay region in the Gulf of Maine needs to be watched because of its potential to kill fish and shellfish.

This news comes shortly after the biotoxin domoic acid closed several shellfish areas. Five Maine shellfish dealers were able to quickly recall the majority of mussels distributed.

Now, the Department of Marine Resources is monitoring an extensive bloom of the phytoplankton Karenia mikimotoi, whic… Read More

By

Christine Blank

Published on
September 20, 2017

Shellfish harvesters and dealers in the U.S. state of Maine are scrambling to respond to a recall of mussels made on 15 September due to the presence of high levels of domoic acid.

The outbreak of the biotoxin closed several shellfish areas affected products sold by five Maine shellfish dealers. When ingested, domoic acid can cause amnesic shellfish poisoning, which can result in illness, brain damage, and memory loss. 

Maine shellfish deale… Read More

By

Jason Holland

Published on
September 14, 2017
WSC 2017

Carey Bomell, president of the International Association of Fish Inspectors (IAFI), brought the World Seafood Congress 2017 (WSC) in Reykjavik, Iceland, to a close with the announcement that the next edition of the biennial conference will be held in Penang, Malaysia.

Taking place in September 2019 and hosted by local partners that include government, the Penang Convention and Exhibition Bureau and the Penang Institute, it will be the first time … Read More

By

Jason Holland

Published on
September 13, 2017
Carey Bomell, president of International Association of Fish Inspectors (IAFI)

The global seafood sector has many compelling stories to tell with regard to being a vital source of food, nutrition, income, and livelihood for hundreds of millions of people around the world, but it could still make a much better job of sharing its successes with the people buying its products, said Carey Bomell, president of International Association of Fish Inspectors (IAFI).

“Seafood is a sector that faces both grand challenges and tre… Read More

By

Christine Blank

Published on
September 7, 2017

A new study aims to allay consumers’ fears about eating seafood that could have been contaminated by the Fukushima radioactive release after the massive earthquake and tsunami in Japan in 2011.

After testing tuna, swordfish, and sharks in the waters near Japan, Hawaii, and California, a team of international researchers found no detectable levels of cesium, a metal with a large number of radioactive isotopes.

“The cesium isotopes are … Read More

By

Christine Blank

Published on
August 31, 2017

The United States government is not complying with a federal law on labeling genetically engineered foods, a new lawsuit filed by the Center for Food Safety alleges.

Filed in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California on 25 August, the Center for Food Safety, an environmental nonprofit based in San Francisco, California, said the U.S. Department of Agriculture has not studied “electronic and digital disclosures” (such… Read More

By

Ben Fisher

Published on
August 8, 2017
Oysters

An outbreak of vibriosis – a bacterial infection that primarily affects the digestive tract – has sickened 25 people who ate raw oysters in the Seattle area last month. 

Vibriosis causes watery diarrhea, fever, headache, severe abdominal cramping, and vomiting, and can be a very serious condition for those who have compromised immune systems. Symptoms generally last for around a week and, in most cases, medical treatment is not r… Read More