Seafood Handbook

The Seafood Handbook is the most comprehensive seafood directory available online. Featuring more than 100 of the most common types of fish and other seafood in the U.S. market, the Seafood Handbook is the ultimate guide to seafood sourcing and preparation, brought to you by the editors of SeaFood Business magazine. And it’s free!

Search by finfish or shellfish. For each type of seafood species, there is a comprehensive overview of the item, its origin, history, availability, product attributes, nutritional value and cooking tips, along with an original hand-drawn depiction. 

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The rock shrimp is a deepwater cousin of the pink, brown and white Gulf shrimp species (Penaeus spp.), but its popularity in the domestic market was slower to develop. The crustacean gets its name from its rock-hard shell, which presented a challenge for processors until a machine was developed to… Read More
The bottom-dwelling, kite-shaped skate is found worldwide in temperate and cold waters as well as in deep, tropical waters. Skates are taken with longlines and gillnets, both as a targeted fishery and as bycatch. Fresh skate landed in winter is considered the best. Only the wings of the skate are… Read More
Of the nine smelt species that inhabit North American waters, the most common is the ubiquitous rainbow smelt, found in the western Atlantic and Pacific oceans and in the Arctic Sea. It is mainly an inshore, anadromous fish that spends most of its life in saltwater but migrates to freshwater lakes… Read More
The name red snapper has been foisted off on just about any fish that is red. However, the FDA insists that only American red snapper, L. campechanus, can be legally shipped interstate bearing the authentic red snapper label. Beware of “snapper” sold on the West Coast; it could actually be… Read More
There are no true soles along America’s eastern shore, though there are several species in European waters. The best of them is the Dover sole, a mainstay of the European seafood scene for generations and considered one of the foundations of Continental cuisine. This thick-bodied flatfish never… Read More
Squid are cephalopods, a word meaning “head foot.” They are a close relative of the octopus and a distant relative of bivalve mollusks. More than 300 species inhabit the world’s oceans, but fewer than a dozen comprise 90 percent of the global catch; of them, three comprise the domestic suppy.… Read More
The prehistoric sturgeon was once abundant in the United States, consumed on both coasts and exported to Europe, where the roe was processed as caviar. By the end of the 19th century, stocks had collapsed, and today, wild fish are almost impossible to obtain. Of the seven North American species of… Read More
Surimi seafood is simulated shellfish made from cooked, mildflavored, lean, white-fleshed fish — most often pollock and hake/whiting. The fish is deboned, minced, rinsed and rendered into an odorless, white paste called surimi to which starches, red coloring, flavorings, binders and stabilizers… Read More
There is only one species of swordfish, Xiphias gladius. This nonschooling fish roams temperate and tropical seas worldwide and is hunted by more than 30 nations. Swordfish  harvesting is governed by the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas. U.S. Atlantic fishermen… Read More
Tracing its origin to the Nile River, tilapia has been farm raised for decades and is cultivated in warm waters the world over. It is the second-most cultured group of fish in the world, exceeded only by carp. Domestically, tilapia are cultured in the southern and western states. Costa Rica and… Read More