Seafood Handbook

The Seafood Handbook is the most comprehensive seafood directory available online. Featuring more than 100 of the most common types of fish and other seafood in the U.S. market, the Seafood Handbook is the ultimate guide to seafood sourcing and preparation, brought to you by the editors of SeaFood Business magazine. And it’s free!

Search by finfish or shellfish. For each type of seafood species, there is a comprehensive overview of the item, its origin, history, availability, product attributes, nutritional value and cooking tips, along with an original hand-drawn depiction. 

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Years ago, opah was thought to bring good luck, and Hawaiian fishermen gave the fish away as a goodwill gesture. But there was also a time when seafood suppliers could find no takers for the moonfish, likely named for its round profile. Opah’s popularity finally blossomed in the late ’80s when… Read More
This species was first fished commercially off New Zealand, and then later off of Australia. It was the New Zealanders who launched the marketing effort for the fish formerly known as slimehead — a distinct marketing handicap. After the Kiwis persuaded the Food and Drug Administration to allow… Read More
Unlike most of the world, where the Pacific oyster has taken over the oyster grounds, America still has its native oyster, the same one that fed the Pilgrims at Plymouth Rock. Today, two-thirds of the national oyster harvest is Eastern oysters. While Pacific oysters are mostly cultivated, Eastern… Read More
European oysters, first farmed by the Romans, were so prized that they were transported across the English Channel in snow-packed barrels. Today, they are farmed off New England, California and Washington state and, to a lesser degree, in France, England and Norway. On the U.S. East Coast, the… Read More
Unlike the native Eastern oyster, the Pacific oyster is a Japanese transplant, brought to this country after the turn of the century to revitalize the West Coast oyster industry after its native Olympia species (Ostrea lurida) crashed. Hearty and easy to propagate, the Pacific oyster is now the… Read More
Although the Pacific Ocean claims over 50 species in the Sebastes genus, the Atlantic has only one ocean perch, a slow-growing, deepwater fish with bright-red or orange-red coloring. Atlantic ocean perch are not actually perch. They’re rockfish that travel in large schools. They are called… Read More
Formerly called Nile perch, Lake Victoria perch is a freshwater fish found in central Africa’s lakes and rivers. Lake Victoria, roughly the size of South Carolina and with 2,000 miles of shoreline, claims the largest population of this species. The fish originated in the Nile River — hence its… Read More
Hailed by many as “the ultimate pan fish,” yellow perch is rivaled only by walleye as the most popular freshwater fish on restaurant menus. The perch are typically 6 to 10 inches long and weigh 1/2 to 1 pound. The species was one of the most important Great Lakes fisheries until the 1990s, when… Read More
Alaska pollock is a member of the cod family, reflected by some of its other names: bigeye cod, snow cod and tomcod. Once dismissed as cod’s poorer cousin, the pollock has come into its own as a valuable resource, a global commodity and a popular item (credited or not) on menus around the world.… Read More
Gourmands describe the Atlantic pompano as “the world’s most edible fish.” The flat-bodied, pan-sized pompano is easy to eat whole, a form that shows off the beautiful, silvery skin. The species is harvested from Virginia to Texas, but primarily off Florida’s west coast. Commercial landings… Read More