Seafood Handbook

The Seafood Handbook is the most comprehensive seafood directory available online. Featuring more than 100 of the most common types of fish and other seafood in the U.S. market, the Seafood Handbook is the ultimate guide to seafood sourcing and preparation, brought to you by the editors of SeaFood Business magazine. And it’s free!

Search by finfish or shellfish. For each type of seafood species, there is a comprehensive overview of the item, its origin, history, availability, product attributes, nutritional value and cooking tips, along with an original hand-drawn depiction. 

Search our Seafood Handbook:

EXPLORE FINFISH     EXPLORE SHELLFISH

The name “porgy” comes from an American Indian name meaning “fertilizer,” a common use for these abundant fish during Colonial times. While porgy is the preferred name for the species in the United States, where it is sold mainly in ethnic markets, in Europe it is called sea bream. About 15… Read More
You’d be hard pressed to find a group of fish with more harvest methods, real names and aliases than the Sebastes genus. The 70 or so fish in this family range from the Bering Sea to Baja California. Many take their common names and nicknames from their skin color: green, brown, dusky, blue,… Read More
Sablefish, thus known because of its black, almost furry skin, is also commonly called black cod, though it is not in the cod family. It is also called butterfish in reference to its melt-in-your-mouth, oil-rich meat. The oil makes sablefish an excellent species for smoking, a treatment relished by… Read More
One of the great success stories of modern aquaculture, Atlantic salmon farming first emerged on a commercial scale in the early 1980s, with Norway leading the way. Since that time, global production has increased tremendously, and Atlantic salmon are farmed in more than a dozen countries around… Read More
Chinooks are the largest and top-of-the-line among the Pacific salmon species. Unlike other Pacific salmon, which spend anywhere from one to three years at sea, kings can stay out as long as five years before returning to their natal streams. They are harvested from central California to the Yukon… Read More
One of the most wide-ranging of the five Pacific salmon species, chums are landed in commercial quantities in the eastern North Pacific from Del Mar, California, to the Arctic Ocean’s Mackenzie River and south to Honshu, Japan. Commercially caught chums run from 6 to 12 pounds. Almost all chums… Read More
Of all the Pacific salmon, the coho looks most like the Atlantic salmon. A sure way to tell the difference is by counting the anal fin’s rays (the hard, bone-like parts). Pacific salmon have 13 to 19 rays; Atlantics have 10 or fewer. Coho is also known as silver salmon, medium-red salmon (a… Read More
The “can-friendly” pink is the smallest and most plentiful of the wild salmon, accounting for the lion’s share of the canned pack. That pink salmon mostly winds up in cans is due partly to its habit of showing up in huge schools during short periods of time and requiring rapid, high-volume… Read More
Sockeye salmon is the most valuable U.S. salmon species and the premium canned salmon, known as red salmon to canners. Sockeye are also known as kokanees (a landlocked species) and quinaults. The name sockeye has nothing to do with the fish’s eyes but is a corruption of the Native American name… Read More
A small cousin of sea scallops, bay scallops average 70 to 100 meats per pound. They are dredged, raked or tonged from bays, harbors and salt ponds along the East Coast from Atlantic Canada to North Carolina and processed ashore. They are also farmed in Nova Scotia and New England in suspended… Read More