Steve Bittenbender

Contributing Editor

Steve Bittenbender works as a freelance journalist based in Louisville, Kentucky. Besides working for SeafoodSource.com as a contributing editor, Steve also works as an editor for Government Security News and as the Kentucky correspondent for the Reuters News Service. He also works as a sports writer for The (Louisville) Courier-Journal and The Associated Press. He has received awards from the Kentucky Press Association and the Louisville Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists for his on-going and enterprise reporting work.

Published on
December 16, 2021

A push to expand offshore aquaculture in the United States garnered more support on Tuesday, 14 December with the refiling of the Advancing the Quality and Understanding of American Aquaculture (AQUAA) Act.

U.S. Rep. Stephen Palazzo (R-Mississippi) and U.S. Rep. Edward Case (D-Hawaii) are the sponsors behind the House version of the bill. Their bill would create a national framework for aquaculture developments and streamline the regulatory

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Published on
December 15, 2021

More than 100 scientists signed a letter sent to Congress on Monday, 13 December, urging lawmakers to ensure that all seafood products imported into the United States are caught using legal means.

Illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing is often associated with human trafficking and other human rights abuses, and distant-water fishing forces vessel owners and operators to extend trips to “achieve a sizeable catch,” the

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Published on
December 10, 2021

The U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday, 8 December, passed a bill that seeks to reform the Federal Maritime Commission and reduce the country's trade deficit ...

Photo courtesy of Philip

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Published on
December 3, 2021

Fishing-related businesses in the U.S. state of New York are now able to apply for direct payments from the second round of COVID-19 relief funding the state received from the federal government.

The money comes from the USD 255 million (EUR 225.4 million) Congress approved in the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021, which lawmakers passed late in 2020.

In March 2021, NOAA Fisheries announced allocations for each state and territory. New

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Published on
November 18, 2021

Two bills that would reauthorize the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act received a hearing on Tuesday, 16 November, in the U.S. House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water, Oceans, and Wildlife.

As U.S. Rep. Don Young (R-Alaska) said in a statement, the hearing was “one of contrasts,” as lawmakers reviewed his proposal and one by Subcommittee Chairman Jared Huffman (D-California). Young said Huffman’s

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Published on
November 4, 2021

NOAA is asking the public for input on additional steps it should take regarding a Biden administration initiative to conserve 30 percent of the country’s lands and waters by 2030.

The U.S. agency that includes NOAA Fisheries announced via the Federal Register that it will accept written comments through 28 December on the government’s Federal eRulemaking Portal for the next two months. In addition, NOAA leaders will host two virtual

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Published on
November 2, 2021

Charter-fishing operators in the Gulf of Mexico will now have more time to install tracking systems meant to help with fisheries management.

NOAA Fisheries published the extension regarding the Southeast For-Hire Integrated Electric Reporting Program in the Federal Register on Tuesday, 2 November. Charter operators with federal charter permits now will have until Tuesday, 1 March, 2022, to have a vessel monitoring system (VMS) installed on their

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Published on
November 1, 2021

Three U.S. senators have reintroduced legislation that would open the door for expanded aquaculture in American waters.

U.S. Senators Roger Wicker (R-Mississippi), Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii), and Marco Rubio (R-Florida) are the initial sponsors behind S. 3100, the Advancing the Quality and Understanding of American Aquaculture (AQUAA) Act. The bill would create federal regulations for fish farms established in the country’s exclusive economic

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Published on
October 29, 2021

A plan to divert sediment from the Mississippi River may help build up fish and shrimp fisheries in the Gulf of Mexico.

If U.S. officials approve the USD 800 million (EUR 689.1 million) plan, it will create more than 15,800 acres of new marshes in two U.S. states over a 50-year period and potentially nearly double that amount. The diversion would build up Louisiana’s delta would also help neighboring Mississippi, according to Chip Klein,

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Published on
October 22, 2021

In advance of next year’s golden anniversary for the National Marine Sanctuaries Act, two congressmen representing key fishery regions have joined forces to relaunch a bipartisan caucus to promote and continue protecting habitats crucial for coastal economies.

U.S. Reps. Jared Huffman (D-California) and Garret Graves (R-Louisiana) will serve as co-chairs for the reestablished caucus, which according to the National Marine Sanctuary

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