Seafood Handbook

The Seafood Handbook is the most comprehensive seafood directory available online. Featuring more than 100 of the most common types of fish and other seafood in the U.S. market, the Seafood Handbook is the ultimate guide to seafood sourcing and preparation, brought to you by the editors of SeaFood Business magazine. And it’s free!

Search by finfish or shellfish. For each type of seafood species, there is a comprehensive overview of the item, its origin, history, availability, product attributes, nutritional value and cooking tips, along with an original hand-drawn depiction. 

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Groupers belong to one of the largest and most widely distributed families of fish, the sea basses. Red grouper (Epinephelus morio) is the most frequently seen grouper in the marketplace and is valued for its availability, flavor and size. Because of limited commercial supplies of the true black… Read More
A premium whitefish, haddock is a member of the cod family, though smaller than Atlantic cod, generally weighing 2 to 5 pounds. The haddock bears a distinguishing black mark, often referred to as the “devil’s thumbprint” or “St. Peter’s mark,” in the “shoulder” area, and its skin is… Read More
More than a dozen hake and whiting species inhabit temperate and cold waters of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Quality varies, depending upon species and handling. There are two separate families of hake, Merluccidae and Gadidae, but Merluccius is most common in the U.S. market,… Read More
Size is the most distinguishing characteristic of the Pacific halibut. The largest of all flatfish, halibut can stretch up to 8 feet long and 4 feet across and weigh over 600 pounds. While such sizes are exceptional, it’s easy to see why fishermen refer to these fish as “whales” or “barn… Read More
The humble herring once determined the fate of kings and empires. The powerful Hanseatic League of Germany and Scandinavia collapsed in the 15th century when herring stopped spawning in the Baltic Sea. Treaties worth millions of dollars were negotiated for herring rights in the New World. But, in… Read More
Hoki is no looker, but a rather homely, tapered, rat-tailed specimen. It’s blue-green above and silvery on the sides and belly. Hoki belongs to the hake family Merluccidae. This deepwater species is harvested year-round from depths of from 600 to 2,500 feet by trawlers working waters off New… Read More
The slender kingklip, a member of the cusk eel family, comprises four species: red (G. chilensis), golden (G. blacodes), South African (G. capensis) and black (G. maculatus). Depending on the species, kingklip can reach 5 to 6 feet long and 50 pounds, but most found on the market average 10 pounds.… Read More
There are several species of langostino, but the one most commonly marketed is Pleuroncodes monodon, a small, lobster-like crustacean found in the cold, deep waters off the coast of Chile, where it is known as langostino colorado. A related  langostino, P. planipes, also called tuna crab, ranges… Read More
If ever there were a fish with an identity crisis, it’s the lingcod, for despite its name, this species is neither a cod nor a ling. Rather, it’s a Pacific greenling, from the family Hexagrammidae. The lingcod likely got the name ling from early settlers who related it to European lings but… Read More
American lobsters have two powerful claws — a crusher and a ripper — which should be kept banded to prevent injury to other lobsters or the cook. The meatiest part of the animal is the tail, though claws, knuckles, body and small walking legs offer meat, too. American lobsters are found in the… Read More