Environment & Sustainability

Published on
December 11, 2018

Despite having had five years to implement measures in the latest version of the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), European Union member states are still lagging behind and likely to miss important 2020 deadlines on biodiversity conservation and sustainable fisheries management, a new report from WWF claims.

The NGO said that member state efforts to implement the CFP are “deeply unsatisfactory” and national ocean strategies have so far

Read More
By

Steve Bittenbender

Published on
December 10, 2018

When U.S. President Donald Trump signed the Frank LoBiondo Coast Guard Authorization Act into law last week, it finally – and permanently – relieved the fishing industry from Environmental Protection Agency regulations regarding incidental discharge on their boats.

The regulation required vessel operators to get EPA permits to perform routine actions, such as using pumped ocean water to clean off the deck after harvesting. It stemmed

Read More
By

Christine Blank

Published on
December 7, 2018

United States supermarket chain Hy-Vee’s efforts to trace mahi is one of the ways the retailer is addressing illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing.

West Des Moines, Iowa-based Hy-Vee, Inc., which operates 245 stores, partnered with Seattle, Washington-based supplier Orca Bay Foods and FishWise to trace products from fishing vessel to supermarket. 

Hy-Vee, Orca Bay, and FishWise worked together to take an in-depth look at

Read More
By

Chris Chase

Published on
December 7, 2018

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released a report on Thursday, 6 December that indicates 2017 was a worse than average year for the entanglement of large whales, but an improvement over numbers in recent years. 

That news was of a worse-than-average year was also tempered by the fact that of the large whales entangled, right whales had fewer entanglements in the U.S. Northeast than in previous periods. The most

Read More
By

Steve Bittenbender

Published on
December 7, 2018

A decision by NOAA Fisheries to issue five permits for seismic air gun blasting in the Atlantic Ocean has drawn sharp criticism from business and environmental leaders who fear the blasts could be harmful for fish and other marine wildlife.

The blasting will be used to conduct surveys that will provide data to oil and gas industry businesses, who may then seek to conduct offshore drilling in federal waters between Cape May, New Jersey and Cape

Read More
By

Chris Chase

Published on
December 5, 2018

An investigation by the Environmental Justice Foundation has discovered shark-finning operations and the killing of rare dolphins and turtles onboard five Taiwanese longline vessels fishing in waters around the world. 

The vessels, which all either fly a Taiwanese flag or are linked with Taiwanese ownership, are part of the country’s distant-water longline fleet and participate in the international tuna market. The crews on all five

Read More
By

Chris Chase

Published on
December 4, 2018

SAI Global, one of the leading certification bodies for the Marine Stewardship Council, announced on 4 December that it's recommending the Atlantic menhaden fishery be certified as sustainable. 

The recommendation is a key step in the fishery attaining MSC certification. Now, the certification will go to a 30-day public comment period. 

Omega Protein, by far the largest fisher of menhaden, has been the company leading the drive for MSC

Read More
Published on
December 4, 2018
Dr. Anaëlle Lemasson

The nutritional qualities of shellfish could be significantly reduced by future ocean acidification and warming, a new study suggests.

With previous research finding that climate change could threaten future production, safety and quality by negatively impacting the fitness of marine species, scientists from the University of Plymouth, United Kingdom, have demonstrated the potential for negative nutritional effects within economically and

Read More
By

Chris Loew

Published on
December 4, 2018

Ryan Bigelow, the senior program manager for Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch, sees Japan as a country ripe for seafood sustainability ratings like those his program provides.

Japan’s population consumes a vast amount of seafood – collectively, the country has one of the largest seafood consumption footprints in the world (third behind China and the European Union) – and because of that, an improvement in the overall

Read More
By

Cliff White

Published on
November 30, 2018

Increasing temperatures, ocean acidification, and deoxygenation are the outcomes from climate change that will cause the most damage the world’s marine economy, according to National Climate Assessment report released by the U.S. Global Change Research Program on Friday, 23 November. 

The federal program that released the report was mandated by Congress to coordinate federal research and investments in understanding the forces shaping

Read More