Seafood Handbook

The Seafood Handbook is the most comprehensive seafood directory available online. Featuring more than 100 of the most common types of fish and other seafood in the U.S. market, the Seafood Handbook is the ultimate guide to seafood sourcing and preparation, brought to you by the editors of SeaFood Business magazine. And it’s free!

Search by finfish or shellfish. For each type of seafood species, there is a comprehensive overview of the item, its origin, history, availability, product attributes, nutritional value and cooking tips, along with an original hand-drawn depiction. 

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Spiny lobsters lack the large front claws of the American lobster and are prized instead for their tail meat, which accounts for 33 percent of the body weight. Some 30 species of spiny lobster are found in tropical and subtropical waters around the world. They are marketed in the United States as… Read More
Mackerel is a handsome but underrated fish, probably because it doesn’t have the mild-whitefish profile American consumers are most comfortable with. The mackerel looks a lot like its cousin, the tuna, but smaller — usually 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 pounds. Shaped for swift swimming, the Atlantic mackerel… Read More
Mahimahi is the Hawaiian name for dolphinfish. The Hawaiian moniker came into common use to prevent consumers from confusing this fish with the marine mammal, to which it is unrelated. The alternative name of dolphin-fish came about from the fish’s habit of swimming ahead of sailing ships, as… Read More
A giant blue marlin was the Cuban fisherman’s quarry in Ernest Hemingway’s classic novella The Old Man and the Sea. The carcass of Santiago’s marlin measured 18 feet in length. While blue marlins are the largest of the marlin species and prized by anglers for their fighting nature, the… Read More
Historically, in Hawaii moi was a delicacy reserved for male royalty; commoners caught eating the fish faced severe punishment. Hence moi’s unofficial title as “the fish of kings.” While Westernization ended the prohibition on moi, access to the fish was limited due to depletion of the wild… Read More
By all accounts, monkfish is one of the ugliest fish in the deep, having a huge head, tiny eyes and an enormous mouth filled with needle-like teeth. On top of that, to lure other fish into its grotesque mouth, it is equipped with a peculiar apparatus that looks like a spike with a bit of meat on… Read More
More than 100 species of mullet are found worldwide in estuaries and the open ocean. In the United States, particularly in Southeast regional cuisine, the striped mullet is the species of choice, prized as much for its roe as for its flesh. The red roe is a valuable export product for markets in… Read More
At one time held in low esteem, the blue mussel has become an aquaculture and culinary success story. While they grow wild, mussels are also farmed in Europe and on both coasts of North America. Maine is the largest U.S. producer, but the domestic market also draws farmed mussels from Canada’s… Read More
The green mussel is native to New Zealand, which has exported it to the United States since 1979. Greenshells are farmed mussels, cultivated on ropes, rafts or longlines. Growing standards, including water quality and production levels, are tightly regulated by the New Zealand government, so… Read More
Related to cuttlefish and squid, octopus are cephalopods, or “head-footed,” referring to the eight “legs” that sprout from their head. They also have a parrot-like beak for crushing prey such as abalone, crab and lobster. There are more than 140 species in temperate and tropical waters… Read More