Steve Bittenbender

Contributing Editor

Steve Bittenbender works as a freelance journalist based in Louisville, Kentucky. Besides working for SeafoodSource.com as a contributing editor, Steve also works as an editor for Government Security News and as the Kentucky correspondent for the Reuters News Service. He also works as a sports writer for The (Louisville) Courier-Journal and The Associated Press. He has received awards from the Kentucky Press Association and the Louisville Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists for his on-going and enterprise reporting work.

Published on
November 10, 2017

Members of Hawaii’s congressional delegation have filed bills that would extend visas to foreign fishermen working on fishing boats in the state.

The moves come more than a year after the Associated Press first reported allegations of labor abuses on commercial vessels. Reporters found about 700 undocumented workers, mainly from Southeast Asia and Pacific island countries, who work for less than USD 1.00 (EUR 0.86) an hour. The AP’s

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Published on
November 9, 2017

With member nations of the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas preparing to meet next week, a global advocacy group is calling on the commission to take immediate action to enact greater protections for tropical varieties of the species.

Among the actions the International Pole and Line Foundation wants the ICCAT to approve when it meets in Morocco is an agreement to reduce quotas on yellowfin and bigeye tuna.

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Published on
November 3, 2017

A Maine congresswoman is calling on the federal government to establish a grant program to preserve waterfront access for those who make a living on it.

U.S. Rep. Chellie Pingree testified at a House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water, Power and Oceans hearing Thursday, 2 November, in support of her bill, dubbed the Keep America’s Waterfronts Working Act. The Democrat said that commercial fishermen and others whose jobs are based on

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Published on
November 2, 2017

Seafood consumption dipped slightly in 2016, as the average American ate 14.9 pounds. The decrease of .6 pounds from 2015’s figures was noted in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) annual Fisheries of the United States report, which was released Wednesday, 1 November.

The report, which provides a snapshot of how commercial and recreational fishing impact the U.S. economy, also noted that commercial fishermen

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Published on
November 1, 2017

For the first time in three years, NOAA Fisheries will allow fishermen to catch red snapper in the federal waters off the South Atlantic coast.

The announcement, which came last week at the request of the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council, means commercial fishermen can harvest up to 75 pounds (34 kilograms) a day starting Wednesday. The tentative date for the close of the season is 31 December, however that may be shortened if the

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Published on
October 25, 2017

A U.S. Senate subcommittee considering the reauthorization of the Magnuson-Stevens Act heard additional testimony Tuesday, with a University of Washington researcher telling lawmakers the U.S. is leaving money in the ocean.

Ray Hilborn, a professor at the university’s School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, noted that in many cases fisheries aren’t even bringing in half of the total allowable catch in some seasons. For example, in

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Published on
October 23, 2017

America’s most valuable commercial seafood port is casting its line toward Washington and hoping to land a federal grant to help it become even bigger.

Officials in New Bedford, Massachusetts, have applied for a USD 15 million (EUR 12.8 million) Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grant with the U.S. Department of Transportation. According to the city’s proposal, officials want to add 800 feet of bulkhead

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Published on
October 19, 2017

U.S. officials accused of allowing red snapper to be overfished in the Gulf of Mexico have called on a federal judge to enter a summary judgement in their case, saying the environmental organizations suing them have a moot point.

The rule challenged by Ocean Conservancy and the Environmental Defense Fund to extend the recreational fishing season has already expired, said Jeffrey Wood, the acting assistant attorney general for the Environmental

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Published on
October 12, 2017

As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency considers removing limitations against a proposed mine in Alaska’s Bristol Bay region, opponents of the measure are making their stances known.

With less than a week before the EPA’s 17 October deadline for public comment, more than 40 Democratic House and Senate members sent a letter to President Donald Trump urging him to maintain Clean Water Act restrictions against the proposed copper

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Published on
October 11, 2017

A Utah congressman has introduced a bill that he claims will restore the original intent of the Antiquities Act.

Bill sponsor U.S. Rep. Rob Bishop said the “National Monument Creation and Protection Act” aims to rid the 111-year-old law, which gives presidents the ability to set aside areas to protect their natural, cultural or scientific features, of political manipulation. If passed into law, the bill would severely cut back the

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