Features

Editorial commentaries on the domestic and global seafood industry.

By

SeafoodSource staff

Published on
February 12, 2008

The California Supreme Court yesterday reinstated a previously dismissed consumer lawsuit aimed at forcing retailers to label farmed salmon as artificially colored.

In the original lawsuit, filed three years ago, 11 California consumers contended that if federal and state regulators failed to enforce country-of-origin labeling (COOL) laws, they should have the right to demand the information through litigation.

Federal COOL laws require

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By

SeafoodSource staff

Published on
February 11, 2008

Only 53 percent of Oregon retailers follow federal country-of-origin labeling laws for seafood, according to an Oregon Department of Agriculture audit.

Agency officials said many of the randomly selected retail stores were unaware of the requirement or how to properly label their products. The audit was conducted on behalf of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agriculture Marketing Service.

"As part of the audit, we were able to provide

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By

Linda Salim, for SeafoodSource from Surabaya, Indonesia

Published on
February 7, 2008

During a press conference in Jakarta on Monday, Saut P. Hutagalung, spokesperson for the Indonesian Fisheries and Maritime Affairs Ministry, announced that the Chinese government had lifted its ban on Indonesian seafood.

The ban was imposed in August of last year, when Chinese custom officials found toxic levels of certain substances, including mercury, cadmium and nitrofural, on Indonesian seafood imports.

Mercury and cadmium are

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By

SeafoodSource staff

Published on
February 4, 2008

The U.S. Department of Commerce announced in Fridayâ??s Federal Register that it dropped 114 Indian companies from the list of foreign shrimp exporters subject to the administrative review of tariffs.

Enacted in early 2005, the tariffs stem from the antidumping petition the Southern Shrimp Alliance, an eight-state group of shrimp fishermen and processors, filed in late 2003.

Last April, the DOC initiated an administrative review of 313 Indian

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By

SeafoodSource staff

Published on
February 1, 2008

The National Marine Fisheries Service this week approved a cut in the commercial and recreational Gulf of Mexico red snapper quota, from 6.5 million pounds in 2007 to 5 million pounds this year. The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council proposed the cut last June to protect ailing red snapper stocks from overfishing.

The commercial red snapper quota is set at 2.55 million pounds in 2008, down from 3.315 million pounds last year. Last March,

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By

SeafoodSource staff

Published on
January 25, 2008

Oceana, an international ocean conservation group based in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday urged retailers Giant Eagle and Costco to post signs in their stores warning customers about the dangers of consuming seafood due to mercury.

Citing ''independent laboratory testing'' of 94 samples of fish and sushi bought in 26 U.S. cities, Oceana revealed that the mercury content of fresh tuna and swordfish samples approached or exceeded levels that

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By

SeafoodSource staff

Published on
January 18, 2008

Snopac Products has purchased the Dillingham, Alaska, seafood processing facility formerly owned by Dragnet Fisheries, the Alaska Journal of Commerce reported on its Web site yesterday.

The Seattle company expects to process 40 million Bristol Bay sockeye salmon and employ 100 workers at the plant this summer, said Snopac spokesman Norm Van Vactor. The company may also process halibut there in late May and early June, but salmon will represent

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By

James Wright, Senior Editor

Published on
January 11, 2008

This summer, the world's top amateur (and some professional) athletes will convene in Beijing for the games of the XXIX Olympiad. All eyes will be on China, but there will be more on display than sports. The safety of the nation's food supply will be under heavy scrutiny because nearly all of the athletes, coaches and attendees' food will be from China, which has wrestled with an unprecedented food-safety crisis over the past several months.

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By

SeafoodSource staff

Published on
January 11, 2008

MURMANSK. Jan 11 (Interfax) - Russia's fishing companies must sell all their export product through fish exchanges beginning January 1, 2009, State Fisheries Committee head Andrei Krainy said.

The exchanges will begin test operation in March-April, Krainy said.

"The principle of a fish exchange is not our invention, we are studying foreign experience, but the actual implementation will be ours, Krainy told the press in Murmansk on Friday.

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