Seafood Handbook Finfish Page

The Seafood Handbook is the most comprehensive seafood directory available online. Featuring more than 100 of the most common seafood species in the U.S. market, the Seafood Handbook is the ultimate guide to seafood sourcing and preparation, brought to you by the editors of SeaFood Business magazine. And it’s free!

For each type of seafood species, there is a comprehensive overview of the item, its origin, history, availability, product attributes, nutritional value and cooking tips, along with an original hand-drawn depiction.

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Cod, considered the “default setting from which all other fish species vary,” belongs to the Gadidae family, also comprising haddock, pollock, hake and hoki. Cod sports a distinctive barbel beneath its chin; at its other end is a broom-shaped tail. Atlantic cod is harvested with bottom trawls,… Read More
Dozens of drum species are found in tropical waters of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans and in the Gulf Mexico. Of greatest value in a niche U.S. market are the red drum and black drum, named for the loud drumming noise they make by contracting muscles connected to their air bladders. Red drum is… Read More
More than a dozen hake and whiting species inhabit temperate and cold waters of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Quality varies, depending upon species and handling. There are two separate families of hake, Merluccidae and Gadidae, but Merluccius is most common in the U.S. market,… Read More
The Atlantic croaker is the smallest member of the Sciaenidae family of drums. The species gets its name from the croaking sound it makes from the voluntary contraction of muscles attached to the air bladder, which acts like a resonance chamber. It’s unclear whether the croaking is a form of… Read More
Around 540 flatfish species belong to the taxonomic order Pleuronectiformes, meaning “sideswimmer.” Flatfish are found throughout the world, though the most commercially important family, Plueronectidae, is concentrated in northern waters. Yellowtail is the most important Atlantic Coast… Read More
Chilean sea bass are not really bass but Patagonian toothfish, a large, slow-growing species first harvested in the early 1980s by Chilean longliners working the continental shelf in depths of 5,000 to 6,000 feet. Chilean sea bass is a member of the Nototheniidae family. In Chile, the fish is also… Read More
Although the Pacific Ocean claims over 50 species in the Sebastes genus, the Atlantic has only one ocean perch, a slow-growing, deepwater fish with bright-red or orange-red coloring. Atlantic ocean perch are not actually perch. They’re rockfish that travel in large schools. They are called… Read More
Sablefish, thus known because of its black, almost furry skin, is also commonly called black cod, though it is not in the cod family. It is also called butterfish in reference to its melt-in-your-mouth, oil-rich meat. The oil makes sablefish an excellent species for smoking, a treatment relished by… Read More
A giant blue marlin was the Cuban fisherman’s quarry in Ernest Hemingway’s classic novella The Old Man and the Sea. The carcass of Santiago’s marlin measured 18 feet in length. While blue marlins are the largest of the marlin species and prized by anglers for their fighting nature, the… Read More
Years ago, opah was thought to bring good luck, and Hawaiian fishermen gave the fish away as a goodwill gesture. But there was also a time when seafood suppliers could find no takers for the moonfish, likely named for its round profile. Opah’s popularity finally blossomed in the late ’80s when… Read More