Seafood Handbook Finfish Page

The Seafood Handbook is the most comprehensive seafood directory available online. Featuring more than 100 of the most common seafood species in the U.S. market, the Seafood Handbook is the ultimate guide to seafood sourcing and preparation, brought to you by the editors of SeaFood Business magazine. And it’s free!

For each type of seafood species, there is a comprehensive overview of the item, its origin, history, availability, product attributes, nutritional value and cooking tips, along with an original hand-drawn depiction.

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Yellowfin, as its name implies, is distinguished from other tunas by a long, bright-yellow dorsal fin and a yellow strip down its side. It’s also more slender than bluefin. With its flashy markings, the yellowfin tuna is especially impressive at night. Fishermen say that when watching yellowfin… Read More
The Pacific, or California, barracuda is one of about 20 species of predatory fish in the family Sphyraenidae. It is found from Baja, California, to Kodiak Island, Alaska, but is most prevalent from Baja to Southern California. The great, or Atlantic, barracuda (S. barracuda) is also a commercial… Read More
Mackerel is a handsome but underrated fish, probably because it doesn’t have the mild-whitefish profile American consumers are most comfortable with. The mackerel looks a lot like its cousin, the tuna, but smaller — usually 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 pounds. Shaped for swift swimming, the Atlantic mackerel… Read More
There is only one species of swordfish, Xiphias gladius. This nonschooling fish roams temperate and tropical seas worldwide and is hunted by more than 30 nations. Swordfish  harvesting is governed by the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas. U.S. Atlantic fishermen… Read More
Formerly called Nile perch, Lake Victoria perch is a freshwater fish found in central Africa’s lakes and rivers. Lake Victoria, roughly the size of South Carolina and with 2,000 miles of shoreline, claims the largest population of this species. The fish originated in the Nile River — hence its… Read More
One of the most wide-ranging of the five Pacific salmon species, chums are landed in commercial quantities in the eastern North Pacific from Del Mar, California, to the Arctic Ocean’s Mackenzie River and south to Honshu, Japan. Commercially caught chums run from 6 to 12 pounds. Almost all chums… Read More
Of the nine smelt species that inhabit North American waters, the most common is the ubiquitous rainbow smelt, found in the western Atlantic and Pacific oceans and in the Arctic Sea. It is mainly an inshore, anadromous fish that spends most of its life in saltwater but migrates to freshwater lakes… Read More
Fishermen call them giants for a good reason: The bluefin tuna is the largest of the commercially harvested tuna species, with a record weight of just over 2,000 pounds and a length of over 12 feet. This fast-swimming migratory species occupies temperate and tropical waters worldwide. Over half the… Read More
Though two fish species are marketed as escolar, L. flavobrunneum is considered the true escolar internationally, and the lesser-valued Ruvettus pretiosus is more widely known as oilfish or castor oil fish. Though considered a succulent species by those familiar with it, escolar’s association… Read More
Yellowtail is a confusing name, as it can apply to flounder, tuna and sole. It’s also the common name for several species of amberjack, sleek migratory tuna-like fish found off both U.S. coasts. The most valuable member of this family is the yellowtail farmed in Japan and featured in U.S. sushi… Read More