February’s most-read: More Alaska salmon

By

Steven Hedlund

Published on
February 29, 2012

Curious what your fellow SeafoodSource readers are viewing? Here’s a rundown of the website’s five most-read stories and commentaries of February 2012.

5) SeafoodSource Contributing Editor Mark Godfrey’s in-depth look at AgriMarine Holdings’ salmon-farming operations in China was this month’s fifth most-read story and commentary. In it, he interviews Daniel Von Mencius, head of marketing at the company’s operations in China, who addresses the potential for growth as well as the challenging of educating Chinese consumers about its product.

4) An investigation into slavery and indentured labor aboard foreign charter fishing vessels operating in New Zealand waters drew a lot of reaction when the Bloomberg Business week report “Fishing as Slaves on the High Seas” broke on 23 February. Sanford Ltd., one of New Zealand’s largest seafood suppliers, was cited in the report, and the company was quick to react to the allegations.

3) There’s a battle brewing between two companies selling krill oil capsules in the United States — Norway’s Aker BioMarine and Neptune Technologies & Bioresources of Canada. The battle is over a patent, and, as SeafoodSource Contributing Editor Mike Urch explains in his 13 February commentary, it may take a while to settle the dispute.

2) And the winners are… On Friday, the 10 finalists for the 2012 International Boston Seafood Show’s Seafood Excellence Awards new products competition were unveiled. Among the finalists are American Pride Seafoods, Fishery Products International, Morey’s Seafood, Grieg Seafood Hjaltland UK and Dish Hospitality, one of last year’s winners. This year’s winners of the foodservice and retail categories will be announced on 11 March. You’ll read it here first on SeafoodSource.

1) Alaska salmon processors’ mid-January announcement to pass on Marine Stewardship Council sustainability recertification was by far last month’s most-read story. This month’s most-read story was Aeon Topvalu’s announcement it’s looking at switching its source of salmon to MSC-certified fisheries in other countries. “Aeon has promoted seafood from well-managed, sustainable sources to consumers, but we will not be able to do so regarding Alaska salmon,” said Yasuyuki Yamamoto, general manager of Aeon Topvalu’s merchandising division, in a letter to the MSC.

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