Aaron Orlowski

Aaron Orlowski

Contributing Editor

Aaron Orlowski is a California-based journalist who writes about fish (both farmed and wild), food, the environment and science. Before settling on the West Coast, he worked for newspapers in North and South Dakota. In his spare time, he attempts to salvage untested recipes in the kitchen.

Published on
August 15, 2019

Mercury levels in seafood can shift as fish seek new sources of prey and as water temperatures warm due to climate change, according to a recent study.

The new study, published in Nature, illustrates that even as global human-driven mercury emissions are declining, warming oceans and shifting predator-prey relationships caused by human fishing practices could still be major drivers of mercury in seafood. 

Most – 80 percent – of

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Published on
August 13, 2019

Climate change will cause fish biomass to decline 5 percent for every one degree Celsius of warming, according to the most comprehensive analysis of marine ecosystem models to date.

The study, which was authored by 35 researchers from 12 countries, combines multiple climate and ecosystem models to create an ensemble model that estimates future global marine biomass — the total weight of all the fish, invertebrates, and marine mammals in

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Published on
August 8, 2019

Time is running out for the fishing and seafood industries to weigh in on a United Nations treaty that will govern fishing and other activities on the high seas.

The treaty is being developed as part of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea and is formally known as the Biodiversity Beyond National Jurisdiction (BBNJ) Agreement. It could raise costs for fishermen by adding administrative and reporting requirements for those who fish

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Published on
July 3, 2019

Global fishing fleets have exploded in size and power since the 1950s, even as it takes more and more effort to catch fewer fish, according to recent research.

And while reducing fishing effort overall could lead to greater catches that require less work, achieving that goal is no simple task.

Between 1950 and 2015, the number of vessels plying the world’s waters doubled from 1.7 million to 3.7 million, while the amount of collective

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Published on
June 24, 2019

Three years after allegations of labor abuses in the Hawaii longline fishing fleet came to light, foreign workers continue to be excluded from the legal protections afforded to U.S. workers, according to a new report from the Georgetown Law Human Rights Institute. 

But a special visa allowing workers to temporarily enter the U.S. could improve conditions by allowing workers to more easily access medical care and legal resources.

The report

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Published on
May 31, 2019

The biodiversity of the world’s oceans is declining in a manner unlike any time in human history.

A recent report from the United Nations paints a dire picture for wildlife around the globe, in both land-based and marine environments. About two-thirds of the marine environment has been significantly altered by human actions and climate change has the potential to make the situation much worse, the report said. 

The report, from the

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Published on
May 8, 2019

Alaskan commercial fishermen are specializing more and more, leaving them more vulnerable to the immense uncertainty fishermen have to contend with, according to a new study.

Targeting a diverse array of fish types in different regions can allow fishermen to weather the ups and downs instigated by fish population changes, new regulations, deflating markets and environmental disasters. But fishermen in Alaska are increasingly specializing. Fewer

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Published on
August 8, 2018

Climate change is driving fish species to migrate to new areas, and in the process they’re crossing political boundaries – potentially setting up future conflicts as some countries lose access to fish and others gain it, according to a recent study published in the journal Science.

Already, fish and other marine animals have shifted toward the poles at an average rate of 70 kilometers per decade. That rate is projected to continue or

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Published on
August 1, 2018

Few international rules govern vessel safety for the 40 million people who work in the fishing industry – a stark contrast to the stringent vessel safety rules that apply to the global shipping industry’s two million workers.

The results are telling: 24 million fishing industry workers are injured every year, and more than 24,000 fishing industry workers die, compared to roughly 300 merchant seafarer deaths per year, according to The

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Published on
June 21, 2018

A flurry of planned and proposed offshore wind projects in the Northeastern United States is causing anxiety among fishermen, who are worried that the turbines will disrupt marine life, make fishing more difficult, and harm their livelihoods.

The United States’ nascent offshore wind industry is predicted to grow rapidly in the coming years as states create and follow through on requirements to source a greater portion of their energy from

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