Seafood Handbook Finfish Page

The Seafood Handbook is the most comprehensive seafood directory available online. Featuring more than 100 of the most common seafood species in the U.S. market, the Seafood Handbook is the ultimate guide to seafood sourcing and preparation, brought to you by the editors of SeaFood Business magazine. And it’s free!

For each type of seafood species, there is a comprehensive overview of the item, its origin, history, availability, product attributes, nutritional value and cooking tips, along with an original hand-drawn depiction.

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Cod, considered the “default setting from which all other fish species vary,” belongs to the Gadidae family, also comprising haddock, pollock, hake and hoki. Cod sports a distinctive barbel beneath its chin; at its other end is a broom-shaped tail. Atlantic cod is harvested with bottom trawls,… Read More
There are no true soles along America’s eastern shore, though there are several species in European waters. The best of them is the Dover sole, a mainstay of the European seafood scene for generations and considered one of the foundations of Continental cuisine. This thick-bodied flatfish never… Read More
The Pacific, or California, barracuda is one of about 20 species of predatory fish in the family Sphyraenidae. It is found from Baja, California, to Kodiak Island, Alaska, but is most prevalent from Baja to Southern California. The great, or Atlantic, barracuda (S. barracuda) is also a commercial… Read More
The colorful tilefish, known as the “clown of the sea,” may look like a tropical species, but it is found from Florida to as far north as Nova Scotia. Tilefish inhabit a narrow stretch of ocean floor in a band of warm water along the upper reaches of the continental slope. The major fishing… Read More
By all accounts, monkfish is one of the ugliest fish in the deep, having a huge head, tiny eyes and an enormous mouth filled with needle-like teeth. On top of that, to lure other fish into its grotesque mouth, it is equipped with a peculiar apparatus that looks like a spike with a bit of meat on… Read More
Size is the most distinguishing characteristic of the Pacific halibut. The largest of all flatfish, halibut can stretch up to 8 feet long and 4 feet across and weigh over 600 pounds. While such sizes are exceptional, it’s easy to see why fishermen refer to these fish as “whales” or “barn… Read More
Found on menus in the whitest of white-tablecloth restaurants, turbot (pronounced tur-bet) is a favored flatfish for discerning chefs. A member of the Bothidae, or left-eyed, family of flounders, turbot (previously known as Psetta maxima) is found in shallow inshore waters throughout the… Read More
The Atlantic croaker is the smallest member of the Sciaenidae family of drums. The species gets its name from the croaking sound it makes from the voluntary contraction of muscles attached to the air bladder, which acts like a resonance chamber. It’s unclear whether the croaking is a form of… Read More
Fishermen call them giants for a good reason: The bluefin tuna is the largest of the commercially harvested tuna species, with a record weight of just over 2,000 pounds and a length of over 12 feet. This fast-swimming migratory species occupies temperate and tropical waters worldwide. Over half the… Read More
Chinooks are the largest and top-of-the-line among the Pacific salmon species. Unlike other Pacific salmon, which spend anywhere from one to three years at sea, kings can stay out as long as five years before returning to their natal streams. They are harvested from central California to the Yukon… Read More