Seafood Handbook Finfish Page

The Seafood Handbook is the most comprehensive seafood directory available online. Featuring more than 100 of the most common seafood species in the U.S. market, the Seafood Handbook is the ultimate guide to seafood sourcing and preparation, brought to you by the editors of SeaFood Business magazine. And it’s free!

For each type of seafood species, there is a comprehensive overview of the item, its origin, history, availability, product attributes, nutritional value and cooking tips, along with an original hand-drawn depiction.

Explore Finfish by searching here:

Farming catfish is truly a U.S. seafood industry success story. It started in Arkansas in the 1960s and expanded into an economic powerhouse as Southern soybean and rice farmers built ponds and processing facilities. Most catfish farms today are located in the Mississippi Delta, with additional… Read More
The slender kingklip, a member of the cusk eel family, comprises four species: red (G. chilensis), golden (G. blacodes), South African (G. capensis) and black (G. maculatus). Depending on the species, kingklip can reach 5 to 6 feet long and 50 pounds, but most found on the market average 10 pounds.… Read More
One of the great success stories of modern aquaculture, Atlantic salmon farming first emerged on a commercial scale in the early 1980s, with Norway leading the way. Since that time, global production has increased tremendously, and Atlantic salmon are farmed in more than a dozen countries around… Read More
This high-valued species is the favored sea bream, prized in Mediterranean cuisine and highly regarded by European chefs. It gets the “gilt-head” name from the golden stripe between its eyes. The Romans reportedly called the bream “Aurata,” the gilded one. The Greek goddess Aphrodite also… Read More
Yellowtail is a confusing name, as it can apply to flounder, tuna and sole. It’s also the common name for several species of amberjack, sleek migratory tuna-like fish found off both U.S. coasts. The most valuable member of this family is the yellowtail farmed in Japan and featured in U.S. sushi… Read More
When trade with Vietnam resumed in 1994, U.S. seafood importers started shipping fillets from a Vietnamese catfish called basa, or bocourti. But most of what’s sold in the market today as basa isn’t basa. Real basa, P. bocourti, is one of 21 species in the Pagasiidae family of catfish found… Read More
Wahoo, a member of the Scombridae family of mackerels and tunas, is closely related to the king mackerel. Hawaiian lore has it that the name wahoo comes from European explorers’ misspelling of “Oahu” on early maps, since the fish was abundant around that island. The fish’s alternate name,… Read More
A relative newcomer to the U.S. seafood market, barramundi is finding a place both at high-end restaurants and mid-scale retailers, where its versatility and eco-friendly reputation have earned it a following. Australia’s Aborigines dubbed this species barramundi, meaning river fish with large… Read More
Mahimahi is the Hawaiian name for dolphinfish. The Hawaiian moniker came into common use to prevent consumers from confusing this fish with the marine mammal, to which it is unrelated. The alternative name of dolphin-fish came about from the fish’s habit of swimming ahead of sailing ships, as… Read More
The name red snapper has been foisted off on just about any fish that is red. However, the FDA insists that only American red snapper, L. campechanus, can be legally shipped interstate bearing the authentic red snapper label. Beware of “snapper” sold on the West Coast; it could actually be… Read More