Seafood Handbook Finfish Page

The Seafood Handbook is the most comprehensive seafood directory available online. Featuring more than 100 of the most common seafood species in the U.S. market, the Seafood Handbook is the ultimate guide to seafood sourcing and preparation, brought to you by the editors of SeaFood Business magazine. And it’s free!

For each type of seafood species, there is a comprehensive overview of the item, its origin, history, availability, product attributes, nutritional value and cooking tips, along with an original hand-drawn depiction.

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This species was first fished commercially off New Zealand, and then later off of Australia. It was the New Zealanders who launched the marketing effort for the fish formerly known as slimehead — a distinct marketing handicap. After the Kiwis persuaded the Food and Drug Administration to allow… Read More
One of the great success stories of modern aquaculture, Atlantic salmon farming first emerged on a commercial scale in the early 1980s, with Norway leading the way. Since that time, global production has increased tremendously, and Atlantic salmon are farmed in more than a dozen countries around… Read More
Sea bass, often marketed by U.S. chefs under the Italian name branzino, is a prized fish in Europe, where it is largely a recreational catch. Small commercial fisheries exist in the Mediterranean. The gear used to catch these bass includes beach and purse seines, trawl nets, trammel nets, longlines… Read More
The name “porgy” comes from an American Indian name meaning “fertilizer,” a common use for these abundant fish during Colonial times. While porgy is the preferred name for the species in the United States, where it is sold mainly in ethnic markets, in Europe it is called sea bream. About 15… Read More
Wahoo, a member of the Scombridae family of mackerels and tunas, is closely related to the king mackerel. Hawaiian lore has it that the name wahoo comes from European explorers’ misspelling of “Oahu” on early maps, since the fish was abundant around that island. The fish’s alternate name,… Read More
More than 20 different species within the Engraulidae family are marketed under the name anchovy. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Fish List recognizes five genus groups: Anchoa, Anchoviella, Cetengraulis, Engraulis and Stolephorus. The anchovy best known in culinary circles is Engraulis… Read More
The ferocious-looking wolffish gets its name from the sharp, protruding teeth it uses to feast on lobsters, clams and other shellfish. Found from southern New England to Greenland and the Barents Sea, the bottom-dwelling coldwater creature is primarily a bycatch of trawl fisheries targeting cod,… Read More
The “can-friendly” pink is the smallest and most plentiful of the wild salmon, accounting for the lion’s share of the canned pack. That pink salmon mostly winds up in cans is due partly to its habit of showing up in huge schools during short periods of time and requiring rapid, high-volume… Read More
Arctic char is a member of the trout and salmon family, and it physically resembles the salmon. Its silvery skin is dappled with pink along the lateral line, and the fish sports green and blue coloration on its back and upper sides. Arctic char is also anadromous like salmon, migrating from… Read More
There are no true soles along America’s eastern shore, though there are several species in European waters. The best of them is the Dover sole, a mainstay of the European seafood scene for generations and considered one of the foundations of Continental cuisine. This thick-bodied flatfish never… Read More