Seafood Handbook Finfish Page

The Seafood Handbook is the most comprehensive seafood directory available online. Featuring more than 100 of the most common seafood species in the U.S. market, the Seafood Handbook is the ultimate guide to seafood sourcing and preparation, brought to you by the editors of SeaFood Business magazine. And it’s free!

For each type of seafood species, there is a comprehensive overview of the item, its origin, history, availability, product attributes, nutritional value and cooking tips, along with an original hand-drawn depiction.

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Sustainability is certainly not an issue with the common carp, which is farmed and fished in freshwater worldwide. Native to Asia, the species eventually made its way into Europe and was introduced in the 1800s to the United States, where it’s now considered an invasive species. Processing… Read More
Black sea bass, a small, plump fish related to grouper, is one of the most important commercial bass species. These bass begin life as males and become females between the ages of 2 and 5. Attractive fish, they lend themselves to display in live tanks. Mature animals have an even pattern of white… Read More
This bone-free shark possesses many of the attributes U.S. consumers are looking for. Promoters hope to find greater acceptance for the dogfish by marketing it under a Food-and-Drug-Administration-approved alternative name: “Cape shark.” Domestically, the species is found along the Pacific… Read More
One of the most wide-ranging of the five Pacific salmon species, chums are landed in commercial quantities in the eastern North Pacific from Del Mar, California, to the Arctic Ocean’s Mackenzie River and south to Honshu, Japan. Commercially caught chums run from 6 to 12 pounds. Almost all chums… Read More
Of all the Pacific salmon, the coho looks most like the Atlantic salmon. A sure way to tell the difference is by counting the anal fin’s rays (the hard, bone-like parts). Pacific salmon have 13 to 19 rays; Atlantics have 10 or fewer. Coho is also known as silver salmon, medium-red salmon (a… Read More
American eels are one of 15 related, snakelike fish species that include the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) and eels in tropical or subtropical rivers entering the Pacific or Indian oceans. Eels are catadromous, meaning that they spawn in the ocean but mature in fresh water. Most eels are caught… Read More
More than 20 different species within the Engraulidae family are marketed under the name anchovy. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Fish List recognizes five genus groups: Anchoa, Anchoviella, Cetengraulis, Engraulis and Stolephorus. The anchovy best known in culinary circles is Engraulis… Read More
Around 540 flatfish species belong to the taxonomic order Pleuronectiformes, meaning “sideswimmer.” Flatfish are found throughout the world, though the most commercially important family, Plueronectidae, is concentrated in northern waters. Yellowtail is the most important Atlantic Coast… Read More
Tracing its origin to the Nile River, tilapia has been farm raised for decades and is cultivated in warm waters the world over. It is the second-most cultured group of fish in the world, exceeded only by carp. Domestically, tilapia are cultured in the southern and western states. Costa Rica and… Read More
The name red snapper has been foisted off on just about any fish that is red. However, the FDA insists that only American red snapper, L. campechanus, can be legally shipped interstate bearing the authentic red snapper label. Beware of “snapper” sold on the West Coast; it could actually be… Read More