Seafood Handbook Finfish Page

The Seafood Handbook is the most comprehensive seafood directory available online. Featuring more than 100 of the most common seafood species in the U.S. market, the Seafood Handbook is the ultimate guide to seafood sourcing and preparation, brought to you by the editors of SeaFood Business magazine. And it’s free!

For each type of seafood species, there is a comprehensive overview of the item, its origin, history, availability, product attributes, nutritional value and cooking tips, along with an original hand-drawn depiction.

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If ever there were a fish with an identity crisis, it’s the lingcod, for despite its name, this species is neither a cod nor a ling. Rather, it’s a Pacific greenling, from the family Hexagrammidae. The lingcod likely got the name ling from early settlers who related it to European lings but… Read More
The name “porgy” comes from an American Indian name meaning “fertilizer,” a common use for these abundant fish during Colonial times. While porgy is the preferred name for the species in the United States, where it is sold mainly in ethnic markets, in Europe it is called sea bream. About 15… Read More
The name “whitefish” can be confusing, because it is often used as a generic marketing term for many saltwater species of mild-flavored, white-fleshed fish. Further, it describes at least seven distinct species of related fish, all found in Arctic and sub-Arctic fresh and salt water. The most… Read More
Alaska pollock is a member of the cod family, reflected by some of its other names: bigeye cod, snow cod and tomcod. Once dismissed as cod’s poorer cousin, the pollock has come into its own as a valuable resource, a global commodity and a popular item (credited or not) on menus around the world.… Read More
Cobia is a relative newcomer to the U.S. market, with limited distribution from a handful of aquaculture operations. However, proponents of cobia farming believe it could be the next tilapia, though with more character and upscale appeal. The species is a proven candidate for aquaculture, as it… Read More
The colorful tilefish, known as the “clown of the sea,” may look like a tropical species, but it is found from Florida to as far north as Nova Scotia. Tilefish inhabit a narrow stretch of ocean floor in a band of warm water along the upper reaches of the continental slope. The major fishing… Read More
There are no true soles along America’s eastern shore, though there are several species in European waters. The best of them is the Dover sole, a mainstay of the European seafood scene for generations and considered one of the foundations of Continental cuisine. This thick-bodied flatfish never… Read More
Trout represents the oldest aquaculture industry in North America, dating back to the first trout hatchery in the 1880s. Today, Idaho accounts for 70 percent of the rainbow trout raised in the United States. All rainbow trout sold domestically are farmed, either in concrete raceways or earthen… Read More
Size is the most distinguishing characteristic of the Pacific halibut. The largest of all flatfish, halibut can stretch up to 8 feet long and 4 feet across and weigh over 600 pounds. While such sizes are exceptional, it’s easy to see why fishermen refer to these fish as “whales” or “barn… Read More
The Atlantic croaker is the smallest member of the Sciaenidae family of drums. The species gets its name from the croaking sound it makes from the voluntary contraction of muscles attached to the air bladder, which acts like a resonance chamber. It’s unclear whether the croaking is a form of… Read More