Jewel Fraser

Reporting from the Caribbean

Jewel Fraser is a Barbadian journalist with roots in Guyana who currently lives in Trinidad and Tobago. She has been a print journalist for more than 20 years and an online journalist for five. A winner of the Inter-American Press Association scholarship in 1989, she has worked as a fixer and stringer for international publications and as a staff journalist in her country of residence. She is a graduate of the Humber College, Ontario, creative writing program.

Published on
September 7, 2018

The National Fisheries Society of Peru (SNP) and The Nature Conservancy recently renewed a technical agreement to collaborate on information and science for improved fishery management.

In a press release, SNP noted that the one-year agreement will see the two organizations working together on research activities and information gathering, as well as with national and international academic institutions to further studies on modern fisheries

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Published on
August 27, 2018

A formerly traditional barter system in Ghana, where bycatch was exchanged for farm produce, has become a highly lucrative backdoor transaction system overseen by Chinese-backed trawlers, threatening the livelihoods of traditional fishers.

Industrial trawlers operating in Ghana's water and manned by Chinese crew are heavily involved in a practice known as saiko, Environmental Justice Foundation Executive Director Steve Trent told SeafoodSource.

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Published on
August 13, 2018

The Bahamas spiny lobster on 7 August became the first Caribbean fishery to receive Marine Council Stewardship certification, placing it among an elite group of just 8 percent of developing countries' fisheries to be certified.

The MSC label is given to wild-caught seafood that has been certified as sustainable according to the MSC's scientific standards. The fishery’s certification was awarded by the accredited third-party assessment body

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Published on
August 10, 2018

Riverine communities along Venezuela's Orinoco River that rely on fish as a major source of food and additional income are losing out to an upsurge of mining activity that is in some cases controlled by illegal armed cartels.

Among the armed cartels controlling illegal mines in the region of the world's third largest river are the ELN (National Liberation Army) and dissident sections of the FARC (Revolutionary Armed Forces) from Colombia, who

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Published on
August 3, 2018

Among the poster presentations at the recently concluded Latin America and Caribbean Congress for Conservation Biology was one examining the issue of incidental capture of sea turtles by fishing gear in Guyana.

The presentation focused on 14 main landing sites around the Essequibo, Demerara, and Berbice rivers between June and July 2018. It noted that Guyana is home to four species of sea turtle, namely the leatherback, Olive Ridley, hawskbill

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Published on
July 19, 2018

Guyana, long the poor cousin of the Caribbean region, with a human development index only slightly better than Haiti's, is turning a new chapter in its economic fortunes, and fisheries are playing a significant role.

Though the recent discovery of significant oil and gas deposits in Guyana's waters has attracted much international press, less notice has been taken of Guyana's burgeoning seafood sector, which development agencies have credited

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Published on
June 26, 2018

The International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas issued amended guidelines with respect to tuna and swordfish fisheries in June.

Among the new or amended guidelines was a stipulation for tuna caught as bycatch to be retained on-board the fishing vessel, while discards would only be allowed in exceptional cases. The updated guidelines also have adjusted the total allowable catch quotas for some fisheries. Further, the

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Published on
June 7, 2018

This is the second in a two-part series investigating the challenge of encouraging the public to eat more seafood against the backdrop of consumer fears over mercury contamination. Part one of the series appeared on Wednesday, 6 June.

Official recommendations from health authorities in the United States and the European Union agree that most people would benefit from eating more seafood. But their warnings to avoid fish that have higher mercury

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Published on
June 6, 2018

This is the first of a two-part series investigating the challenge of encouraging the public to eat more seafood against the backdrop of consumer fears over mercury contamination. The second part of the series will appear tomorrow.

It’s a rare occasion when representatives of industry, academia, and government all agree.

The fact that the U.S. seafood industry, an army of health experts, and the U.S. government all want to see the

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Published on
May 25, 2018

Fisheries ministers from member states of the Caribbean Regional Fisheries Mechanism (CRFM) were expected to move forward with fisheries management plans for blackfin tuna and the use of fish aggregating devices, at a meeting held mid-May in Montserrat.

This 12th Meeting of the CRFM Ministerial Council followed up on April's meeting of the Caribbean Fisheries Forum, the technical and advisory arm of the CRFM, and sought to advance the agenda for

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